Photographic Practice: Lighting Styles Studio Workshop (Studio)

Sorry for the lack of content I couldn’t commit my time to post content to the blog. In this blogpost we will be looking at two of my studio workshops. Both of these workshops tackled two different sets of lighting styles for portraits.

High, Mid and Low Key Lighting:

 Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.36.32 Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.36.50 Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.37.15
Here we have an example of a High Key lighting style. High Key lighting has high contrast, and dominant light tones and highlights, against a white backdrop.

The fill to key light ratio across the subject is and most of the time is 1:1 The backdrop is overexposed by up to 2 stops creating a pure white area.

The second image is an example of a Mid Key lighting style. Mid Key lighting has dominant mid tones across the whole image with a larger tonal range.

The fill to key light ratio is very minimal for example 2:1

The last image is an example of Low Key lighting style. Low Key Lighting has high contrast and have dominant dark tones and shadows, against a dark backdrop.

The fill to key light ratio across the subject is low, for example 4:1

From this workshop we were explained that High, Mid and Low Key lighting are basic descriptions for lighting styles and setups, that are not strict and can be made flexible. For example Richard Avedon’s work in his book the American West, has a high key background, but it could be argued there’s Mid Key lighting on the sitter. They are meant to serve as a basis and can be mixed and matched to serve your portrait photography.

Five Basic Lighting Styles:

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.37.52

 This is an example of Butterfly Lighting, this is achieved by positioning the key light directly in front of the subjects face and adjusting the height to create a shadow directly under, and in line with, the nose.

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.38.08

This is an example of Rembrandt Lighting. Rembrandt lighting is obtained by combining short lighting and butterfly lighting. You place the light above the subject but off centre, this allows the triangle to form.

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.38.18

This is an example of Broad Lighting is when the main light is positioned in such a way that it illuminates the side of the face that is turned toward the camera. Broad lighting is similar to Butterfly Lighting.

 Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.38.27

This is an example of Split Lighting. Split Lighting is where the light splits the face evenly with one side being in the light, and the other in shadow. It is often used to create dramatic images.

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 20.38.34  This is an example of Short Lighting. Short Lighting is when the main light illuminates the side of the face that is turned away from the camera.

From this workshop we taught five different lighting styles and basic descriptions. They are meant to serve as a basis and can be mixed and matched to serve your portrait photography.

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