Historical Photographic Processes

This blog post will be more work from my Unit 5 Contextual Influences in Art and Design. Today we will be looking at as the title implies Historical Photographic Processes. We were all given different processes to look at and create a simple summary of the process.  I was given the Camera Obscura and Daguerrotype to research.

Process: Camera obscura

Photographers/Artists associated with process: Abelardo Morrell

What is the Camera Obscura?

A camera obscura (this is Latin that translates to “dark chamber”) is an optical device that paved the way for photography and the camera. The device is made up of a box with a hole in one side. Light from outside of the box passes through the hole and projects onto a surface inside, where it is reproduced and rotated 180 degrees, but with color and perspective preserved. The image can then be projected onto paper, and can be traced to produce a highly accurate representation of the scene you are looking at. The largest camera obscura built in the world is on Constitution Hill in Aberystwyth, Wales.

This is a diagram of how light enters the camera obscura and projects the image onto a mirror so the image could be then projected to the viewer or somewhere else.

This is a diagram of how light enters the camera obscura and projects the image onto a mirror so the image could be then projected to the viewer or somewhere else.

This is a projection from a camera obscura, the image has been flipped as the projection from the camera obscura was upside down due to the mirror they were using.

This is a projection from a camera obscura, the image has been flipped as the projection from the camera obscura was upside down due to the mirror they were using.

Process: The Daguerrotype Printing Process

Photographers associated with process: André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri and Johann Baptist Isenring

What is the Daguerrotype Printing Process?

A Daguerreotypist is someone who prints under the Daguerreotype Process. Daguerreotype was introduced in 1839 as the first publicly announced photographic development process, and that had widespread use.

To make a daguerreotype, the daguerreotypist must polish a sheet of silver-plated copper to a mirror finish, treated with fumes. That makes the surface light sensitive when it is exposed in a camera. Depending on how long the exposure is judged to be necessary, which could be as little as a few seconds for brightly sunlit subjects or much longer with less intense lighting

Here is an Unframed Daguerrotype print, which has been weathered as the sides of the print have been damaged.

Here is an Unframed Daguerrotype print, which has been weathered as the sides of the print have been damaged.

Here we have a framed Daguerrotype print that has been well looked after.

Here we have a framed Daguerrotype print that has been well looked after.

There will be a few more posts on my Unit 5 Contextual Influences in Art and Design, the last post will be the essay as the concluding post. Sorry for the layout formatting issues, WordPress was having trouble with the image arrangement.

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